Self-publishing authors should utilize their amazon author page in order to increase sales

Welcome to the 3rd segment of Utilizing Your Amazon Author Page!

Your Amazon Author Page is a great resource for all authors, but especially for self-publishers who has chosen a different route than traditional publishing.  Selling books through Amazon has become one of the top resources for self-publishers so utilizing this page correctly can be a big plus for book sales.

In part 1, we discussed the advantages of customer reviews and how it logs the comments that were written for your book.  Reviews can be persuasive and convince the customer to BUY IT NOW!  In part 2, we covered the product details section which provides specific information including the age range, the page count, and the dimensions of your book.

Today, we will address the purpose of a book description (also known as a blurb).

The description is a vital component to your Amazon Author Page because it immediately pitches the story to your customers plus it helps them understand the main idea and plot to your book.  A catchy description might lead to more sales whereas a poorly written one will cause the customer to search for something else.  Take a look at the description for Little Kids, Big Voices Math Workbook, Grades 1-3.  See below.

This description covers all of the major components that are needed in just 4-6 sentences.  It’s not too long plus it identifies its target age, its goal or purpose, and it gives a little background on the qualifications of the writer.  Very long descriptions can become a burden to read especially when you’ve read through at least 20 of them.  Try to keep your descriptions catchy, but short and concise!

Please, DO NOT rush through writing your description.  Take the time to edit it and rewrite it as many times as needed.  If you can, join a writing group and share it with them.  You’ll be pleased in the end! Visit Author Central to revise and edit your account.


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About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


The copyright page is essential to the formatting of your book and should include the following items:

1. Publisher’s logo

2. Publisher’s contact information

3. Copyright date and notice

4. Publication date

5. Cataloging information

6. The author, editor, graphic designer, and illustrator credits

7. ISBN number

8. Library of congress number

9. Where the book was printed

10. Copyright infringement statements

What’s the big deal?

The copyright page also known as the edition notice contains the most valuable information about your book so plan on bookstores, librarians, and retailers locating it.  It helps bookstores determine how to shelf your book so either hire an excellent PCIP Cataloger or obtain your CIP from the Library of Congress. It also provides customers with infringement statements which prevent others from copying your work without your permission.

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CIP Versus PCIP

Where does the copyright page go?

The copyright page is normally on the left hand side and goes directly behind the main title page.  Some books have mini-title pages that include only the title, but the main title page usually includes the authors name, the publisher, and where the book was published.

Take a look at the copyright page for Broccoli Chronicles.

Notice that the copyright page is thorough. It contains the items mentioned above in addition to a few others – trademark information and where to find educational resources. It is clean, crisp, and easy to read. Make sure that your copyright page is professional and appealing to customers.


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About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


Tip 6 of 6 Tips for Aspiring Writers

Yay!! You are finally ready to seek the guidance and expertise of a Literary Agent.  So…what’s next?

Well, first you need to purchase the Guide to Literary Agents and research those that are in your specific genre.  If you’ve written a picture book, then you need to locate agents that represent children’s authors.  Make a list or spreadsheet of the agents that accept picture book submissions and be prepared to send them your information, one by one.  It is imperative that you cross-reference the information from the Guide to Literary Agents with specific guidelines from their website especially since information changes daily and you want the current information.  If they take submissions only online then you should not send your submission through the mail.  Read every detail carefully!  It can be the difference between you getting a contract and your manuscript being dumped in the trash.

Remember to address all inquiries specifically to that person and refrain from using greetings such as – To Whom It May Concern.  Make sure that you read their bio and submission guidelines thoroughly.  If they request a query letter, synopsis, and the first ten pages of your manuscript, then it’s important that you send them EVERYTHING that they want!  Keep track of your submissions so that you don’t contact the same agent twice.  Sometimes, it’s okay to contact an agent following a rejection letter if you have significantly revised your manuscript and/or you are submitting materials for another book that you have written.

Not every author receives a contract from the first agent that they’ve queried.  Don’t be alarmed if you do not receive a response from them at all.  Continue to remain positive and if necessary, contact every agent in that field.  If you haven’t received a contract after two years or after you’ve queried 20+ agents then you possibly need to move to your Plan B.  No one knows your Plan B, except for you.  Maybe you need to take a break from writing.  Possibly take a trip somewhere and when you come back, be prepared to revise your manuscript, synopsis or query letter.  Also, you may consider self-publishing, which is becoming a great route for new authors.  Regardless, never give up on your writing and continue to believe in yourself or no one else will.  This is a competitive business and only the strong and persistent survive.

Good luck!


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About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.

Welcome to my writer blog, teacher blog, and self-publishing blog

Welcome! I’m Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva, author of the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles. This is where you find writing and educational tools to help kickstart your writing career.

Check out our resources and tools for aspiring writers, self-publishers, educators, and folks who love to read children’s books.


About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.

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