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Reading Builds Character is a reading program and nationwide initiative which encourages kids to read at least 15 minutes per day. Building Voices is working with Read Aloud, TCD Kids Foundation, and local parks in order to promote reading and provide free books to kids. They also participated in the 2015 Read for the Globe and Read for the Record campaigns.

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva reads to kids to support Reading Across the Globe

On November 19, 2015, Building Voices is searching for educators and parents to read to various children across the world. With your help, Reading Builds Character will inspire children to embed reading into their daily routine. You can get involved by hosting your own reading event or partnering with another organization. Contact Building Voices for details.

About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


Aspiring writers need to build their audience

Many writers make the mistake of building their author platform at the last-minute instead of starting the process prior to the books publication date. In order for this to work, your timing and understanding of “platform” must be in tack.

Platform has less to do with self-promotion and more to do with building your audience, authority, exposure, and consistency. Many authors are concerned with recognition and popularity, but forget to focus on building long-lasting relationships with their readers and becoming an expert in their field through research and experience.

Take a look at the following questions. They should serve as a guide for you in building your own platform in the future.

1. What communities, writing groups or memberships are you apart of?
THIS SHOWS YOUR COMMITMENT TO YOUR CRAFT.

2. How many Facebook or Twitter followers do you have?
THIS SHOWS THE SUPPORT FROM YOUR COMMUNITY AND READERS.

3. Do you blog or guest blog? How many subscribers do you have?
THIS SHOWS YOUR ABILITY TO CREATE NEW CONTENT.

4. Where has your work been published or seen?
THIS SHOWS YOUR WRITING AND PUBLISHING ABILITIES.

5. What are your credentials and qualifications?
THIS SHOWS YOUR CREDIBILITY AND EXPERTISE.

6. Have you been invited to speak at a conference or convention?
THIS SHOWS YOUR AUTHORITY ON THE SUBJECT.

7. How much website traffic do you get?
THIS SHOWS YOUR ABILITY TO REACH AND KEEP NEW READERS.

Suggestions on how to build your author platform
1. Speak at conferences
2. Network with publishers
3. Join writing groups
4. Obtain a MFA in writing
5. Create a blog
6. Publish articles in magazines
7. Attend ALA and other book conferences
8. Gain blog and email newsletter subscribers
9. Take courses through UCLA Extension

Tips to remember
1. Blog weekly and tweet daily.
2. Remember that people buy books so try to connect with your readers.
3. Don’t chase money, chase the vision. The money will come.

RELATED ARTICLES:
Advice for Writers: Find a Quiet Room to Write
Advice for Writers: Find the Right Editor

About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


Too many hats

Some say that there’s a downside to wearing multiple hats. Their argument is supported by the figure of speech Jack of all trades, master of none which indicates that some people are knowledgeable in many areas, but never master any of them.

They also argue that wearing multiple hats is a deterrent for customers because it confuses them. They feel that customers should understand the product and the brand messaging right away. And if there’s confusion on who’s the author or publisher, then this can deter them from purchasing your product.

But if you’re the illustrator as well as the author, and your product and brand messaging are clear then multi-tasking or wearing multiple hats shouldn’t be an issue for your customers.

Wearing many hats has become the basis for some startup companies and new indie publishers. At the inception, business owners crave those that can wear multiple hats (check emails, answer phones, attend events, handle the bookkeeping, etc) because they usually don’t have the funds to pay people individually. In the indie publishing world, the author and publisher or the editor and marketing specialist are often the same people. This creative technique saves time and money, which are valuable to small companies.

So…is multi-tasking characterized as ADD-like behavior? Can it cause more stress and less productivity or is it the sole basis of a new company? Please share your thoughts!

About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


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