TOP TEN STEPS

1. Create a business name. Search online to make sure that no one else is using that name.  If it’s available, then purchase the domain name right away.

2. Register your name as a DBA at the local county clerk’s office.  Then contact either Legal Zoom or Legal Filings to form a Legal Liability Company (LLC).

3. For around $325, you can trademark your name which will protect others from using it.  For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/.

4. Purchase a set of ISBN’s and register your indie publishing company through Bowker.

5. Open a business account through your local bank.  It’s better to get a checking account so that you can write checks for various services.

6. Apply for a business license, wholesale license and seller’s permit through your local city.

7. Contact the IRS to receive an EIN for the purpose of filing taxes.  For more information, visit http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-%26-Self-Employed/Apply-for-an-Employer-Identification-Number-%28EIN%29-Online.

8. Create a professional and informative website that includes your contact information, about us, mission statement and more.

9. Find a printing company and distributor that will print and distribute your book to Amazon.com, BN.com and various indie bookstores.  Lightning Source, IngramSpark and CreateSpace are the most popular companies that self-publishers and indie presses turn to.

10. Go to Bowker Identifiers to upload pertinent information about your company and your book.

Wal-Mart.com USA, LLC

About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.


Issue #4: Many high school students are unaware of valuable resources such as the college center and/or the public library.  They often find out about it a month or two before graduation instead of discovering this information at the start of their high school year or even sooner.  By this time, it’s too late.  Statistics show that graduation rates and college acceptance letters are decreasing.  I believe this is due to the fact that children don’t value education like our parents and grandparents did.

 

Tip #4: Children must be taught the value of education at an early age.  This includes familiarizing them with the library, the college center, tutoring facilities, test prep courses, bookstores and more.  The more knowledge and information they have, the smarter they will be which will result in better decision-making.  Take a trip this weekend to the library or the bookstore.  Show your child the different types of non-fiction and fiction books that exist.  Pick a particular topic of interest and browse through that category.  Practice doing this a few times and hopefully one day, your child will get the hang out it.

 

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” — Benjamin Franklin

Tip 4 of 6 Tips for Aspiring Writers

Your 30,000+ word manuscript is complete and you are ready to send it out to various literary agents and/or publishing companies.  Start off by drafting a one page query letter that contains a hook, your summary, author’s bio and your closing.  DO NOT send out generic letters that state, To Whom This May Concern. Spend some time viewing the agents website to gather important information such as their name, submission guidelines and genres of interest.  Make sure that you address your query letters separately to each agent.  When writing your bio, only include the information that is pertinent to your story and that particular field.  For example, if you are a full-time teacher with a degree in English or Creative Writing this coincides with your children’s book.  Mentioning a degree in Cooking or Finance doesn’t help build your platform in the Children’s Fiction industry.

Next, you must put together a two page synopsis that contains your hook and addresses the main characters and their purpose, the main conflict and the conclusion.  Take the hook and summary of your query letter and simply elaborate.  Make sure to discuss your protagonist and antagonist along with their purpose and motivations in the story.  Also, address the major conflicts and how your main characters tackle them.  Finally, provide a sneak peek of what happens in the end of the story.  You should never end with a cliffhanger, but also don’t give away every single detail that happens.  Remember, it’s a summary.

RELATED ARTICLES:
Aspiring Writers Tip 5
Aspiring Writers Tip 6

About 

Taneeka Bourgeois-daSilva is an authorpreneur, teacher, blogger, educational consultant, and writing coach. She wrote the award-winning Broccoli Chronicles and is the CEO of Building Voices and TCD Kids Foundation. She tweets at @taneekabdasilva.

Last updated by at .